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Can pre-transplant MRD testing predict patients who are more likely to relapse?

Jul 12, 2022
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Learning objective: After reading this article, learners will be able to cite a new clinical development in AML

During the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, the AML Hub spoke with Christopher Hourigan, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, US. We asked, Can pre-transplant measurable residual disease testing (MRD) testing predict patients who are more likely to relapse?

Can pre-transplant MRD testing predict patients who are more likely to relapse?

Hourigan begins by discussing the logistics of bone marrow transplants and the current utility of MRD in clinical practice. Hourigan outlines the study presented by their group at ASCO, highlighting overall survival in patients with NPM1 or FLT3 mutations and the impact of MRD on relapse and survival. Finally, Hourigan describes the upcoming study, MEASURE, which aims to establish a national framework to introduce MRD testing into care for patients with AML undergoing transplant.